Poverty

and Conflict

“Every person searching for a better life deserves safety and dignity” 

Antonio Guterres, UN Secretary-General 

The search for economic opportunities, whether out of choice or necessity, is a decisive factor for many in the decision to migrate. 

Security from violent conflict is another primary driver of migration.  

Our Approach 

IOM protects and assists those escaping violence and destitution in an unstable world. 

We also recognize that investing in sustainable development is essential to maintaining migration as an option that benefits both migrants and host communities.  

USA for IOM’s Initiatives

Central American Minor Family Reunification​

Initiatives

More than 1,000 minors reunited with their families.

USA for IOM assisted Central American minors from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras fleeing conflict, insecurity, and economic crisis reunite with their families in the US amid COVID-19. This work was made possible by the generous contribution of The Shapiro Foundation.

Program participants were previously approved for travel to the United States under the US Citizenship and Immigration Service’s Central American Minors (CAM) Parole Program. 

“I remember a few times where I’ve been thanked by the beneficiaries or their relatives for helping them throughout the process, as every little step they take forward, brings them closer to the day they see their loved ones.”– IOM Colleague

Socio-Economic Integration of Venezuelan Migrants

Initiatives

Integrating Venezuelan migrants into their host communities through entrepreneurship and job training.

To strengthen local communities and the migrants within them, USA for IOM launched a regional program to integrate Venezuelan migrants in Latin America.

With the financial support of Citi Foundation, USA for IOM identified gaps in labor demand in host countries and empowered migrants to fill them with skills training and tools for entrepreneurship.

By improving the economy and local livelihoods of host countries, Venezuelan migrants become agents of local development, combating xenophobia in the process.